Richard Pryor Sings the Blues

From Bullseye with Jesse Thorn from NPR:

Terry Crews has taken a pretty unconventional path. He played football in college, but he didn’t go on scholarship, and joined the team as a walk on. He played in the NFL for years as a linebacker with the Rams and the Chargers, but when he was done, he didn’t become a sports commentator.

Instead, Crews went back to one of his first loves — the arts. And while he continues his devotion to his workout regimen, he now uses his physicality in his work as an actor. He’s worked steadily in a string of movies like The Longest Yard and The Expendables, and adds a tough-but-caring element to his characters in TV shows like Everybody Hates Chris and Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

You can see him now as an essential part of Brooklyn Nine-Nine's ensemble as the police detective and family man, Sergeant Terry Jeffords. The show's first season finale airs Tuesday, March 25th on FOX.

Crews is also releasing a new memoir in May, called Manhood: How to Be a Better Man-or Just Live with One.

This week, Crews tells us about growing up in Flint, Michigan, discovering his love of both art and physical fitness, the difficulty of ending an NFL career, and the joys of working on Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

Photo credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

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From Bullseye with Jesse Thorn from NPR:

Russell Simmons is one of the few people that can honestly say he helped build hip hop. He was an entrepreneur early on, promoting parties and hustling fake cocaine when he was still a college student in the late 1970s. He was there one night at the Charles Gallery, when the headliner DJ Easy G brought on a local rapper, and Simmons felt Eddie Cheeba work the crowd into a frenzy.

It was his first real introduction to hip hop, and he could see that it would be more than just a passing fad. He went on to co-found the music label Def Jam Recordings with Rick Rubin and build a roster of hugely successful hip hop artists, starting with a teenage LL Cool J and the punk rock-turned-hip hop group The Beastie Boys. Simmons worked hard to build sustainable brands for his artists, and took pride in their authenticity. And he wasn’t content to focus on music — his ambition led him to create an empire, expanding into fashion, television, film, journalism, finance, and philanthropy.

Simmons’ abundance of energy helped earn him the nickname “Rush”, but he says he owes much of his success to inner tranquility and stillness. He’s practiced yoga and meditation for over fifteen years, and in his new book, Success Through Stillness: Meditation Made Simple, Simmons seeks to “demystify” meditation for the average person, and explain its link to personal and professional growth.

He joins us to talk about the pivotal moment that he heard Eddie Cheeba and found himself sold on hip hop, building Def Jam, leaving drugs behind for yoga and meditation and finding inner stillness.

Photo credit: Rick Kern/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Want to hear more? For more interviews about the best in culture, comedy, and recommendations every week, subscribe to our podcast in iTunes, with our RSS feed or search for “Bullseye with Jesse Thorn” in your favorite podcast app.


My entry in the New Yorker caption contest